Karamoja schools struggle to cope with ICT

Karamoja schools struggle to cope with computer lessons
Coxton Ariyo, the Deputy Head Teacher Moroto High School, says that with only 15 functioning computers at school, most students have no access to the computers, making them to study only theory.

Secondary schools in Karamoja sub-region are struggling to cope with computer lessons due to the limited number of teachers and computers. This publication has learned that computer access is still a nightmare to many students in the region.

In 2011, the Education Ministry announced compulsory computer lessons in secondary schools. However, computer studies have remained a huge challenge in Karamoja. In Kangole Girls secondary school, only ten computers are available for more than 680 students at school.

Sr. Noellina Birungi Namusisi, the Head teacher Kangole Girls secondary school, says due to the limited number of computer only “A” level students, study computer lessons.

Sr. Birungi notes that the school is also grappling with a limited number of computer teachers, adding that the available computer teachers are not even on the government pay roll.

Coxton Ariyo, the Deputy Head Teacher Moroto High School, says they are struggling to teach computer lessons to more than 500 students. Ariyo notes that with only 15 functioning computers at school, most students have no access to the computers, making them to study only theory.

He adds that priority for computer lessons has been given to ‘A’ level students. Only one teacher for computer is on government payroll and the other is a part-timer.

Information obtained from Kotido secondary school indicates that the school is operating with only two functioning computers for learners. A reliable source at school told this publication that access to a computer in Kotido is like a dream to students including those offering ICT at ‘A’ level.

The Head Teacher, Jackson Matsanga declined to comment when contacted on the matter. Clementina Angom, a student at Moroto High School, says they share computers and do practical work and exercises in shifts.

Angom, who is in senior six, says it always takes them more than a day to complete whatever exercise is given by teachers.

URN